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London Rail Lines Get New Names and Colors

London Rail Lines Get New Names and Colors

The London Overground rail network is undergoing a significant transformation with the introduction of six distinct names and colors for its lines. This move aims to make the network easier to navigate, with the names chosen to honor and celebrate different aspects of London’s unique local history and culture. According to Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, the overhaul is expected to be one of the biggest changes in the history of the British capital’s Tube map, which has been criticized for being overly complex and difficult to understand.

The new names and colors will be represented on Tube maps as parallel lines in different colors, allowing passengers to easily identify the correct train. The six lines will be named after different aspects of London’s cultural heritage, including the Lioness line, which will run between Euston and Watford Junction, and is named after the England women’s football team’s Euro 2022 victory. The Mildmay line, which will run between Stratford and Richmond/Clapham Junction, is named after the Mildmay Mission Hospital in Shoreditch, which treats patients with HIV-related illnesses.

The Windrush line, which will run between Highbury & Islington and Clapham Junction/New Cross/Crystal Palace/West Croydon, is named in tribute to the Windrush generation, who came to the UK from the Caribbean to fill labor shortages after the Second World War. The Weaver line, which will run between Liverpool Street and Cheshunt/Enfield Town/Chingford, is named after the textile trade that once thrived in the areas it runs through. The Suffragette line, which will run between Gospel Oak and Barking Riverside, is named in tribute to the movement that fought for votes for women. Barking was home to suffragette Annie Huggett, who lived to 103.

London Rail Lines Get New Names and Colors

The Liberty line, which will run between Romford and Upminster, is named after Havering’s historical self-governance as a royal liberty. The changes are estimated to cost £6.3 million, which will be paid for out of Khan’s Greater London Authority budget. The majority of this will go towards updating customer information, including redesigning and redisplaying maps across all Tube and London Overground stations, and issuing new versions in print and online.

Public address announcements will be re-recorded and around 6,000 station direction signs will be updated. John Bull, editor of transport website London Reconnections, welcomed the change, saying it is “an overdue change”. He noted that while some may grumble about the names, it is a step towards making the network more accessible and easier to navigate.

The rebranding will be rolled out over a week in the autumn, and it is expected to make a significant impact on the way passengers experience and interact with the London Overground network. With its new names and colors, the network will be better equipped to serve the diverse needs of its users, and will provide a more welcoming and accessible environment for all.

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